Friday excitement: Panoramic data inspection

I teach Tuesdays and Thursdays this year, leaving Fridays welcomely wide open for non-teaching related productivity. Today’s task is arguably the most exhilarating aspect of doing Science – inspecting raw data to make sure there are no major errors or problems in the dataset, so I can then analyze it and change the world. The excitement is truly hard to contain.

Delectable dog food is the dataset; I’m the dog.

No, it’s not the funnest, but it’s an important part of doing Science. To make your life easier, you should inspect data daily as you collect them. This way, you can identify mistakes and make notes about outliers early on, so that you are not stupefied and stalemated by what you see when you sit down to begin analysis.

You (corgi) are getting ready to analyze and you find an anomalous observation (door stop) you didn’t notice when you were collecting data.

Today I’m looking at measurements I took from ape mandibles housed in an English museum last summer; I inspected data before I left the UK for KZ, so today should be a breeze. But no matter how meticulous you are in the field/museum, you still need to inspect your data before analyzing them, just to be safe. If you’re as disorganized as I am, there will be lots of programs each with lots of windows. Here’s a tip: plug into multiple monitors (or at least one big ass monitor), so you can easily espy all open windows and programs in prodigious panorama.

Using two monitors helps when checking data for errors and patterns

Using two monitors helps when checking data for errors and patterns. On my left screen I’m using R to visualize and examine the raw data open in Excel on the right screen. If something seems off on the left screen, I can quickly consult the original spreadsheet on the right.

Barely visible in the above screenshot, these are chimpanzee (red) and gorilla (black) mandible measurements plotted against a measure of body size, preliminarily described in this post from last August. I’m looking at whether any mandibular measurements track body size across the subadult growth period, in hopes that bodily growth can be studied in fossil species samples dominated by kid jaws. As you can (barely) see, some jaw measurements correlate with body size better than others, and sometimes the apes follow similar patterns but other times they don’t.

The data look good, so now I can go on to examine relationships between mandible and body size in more detail. Stay tuned for results!

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